Tag archives for yellowstone

A Backcountry Recovery in Yellowstone: “These Horses Saved My Life” (Part 5 of 5)

“Life is very, very short. It’s up to you to fill the book of life with beautiful and interesting chapters.” – Veteran Ray Knell The short days on an adventure are often the most memorable. The days when you relax, soak in the experience, and aren’t constantly pushing yourself. The days that you really get…

A Backcountry Recovery in Yellowstone: Tracked by a Curious Bison (Part 4 of 5)

Rain and cold were our companions as we rode our horses and mules north along the eastern edge of Yellowstone Lake, North America’s largest lake above 7,000 feet. Muddy trails made travel slow and spirits sink. We had a massive 30-mile day ahead of us. The wind intensified and chilled us to our bones. The temperature wasn’t freezing, but…

A Backcountry Recovery in Yellowstone: Camping in the Lower 48’s Most Remote Place (Part 3 of 5)

I woke up to the not-so distant howl of a wolf in the deepest backcountry location in the Lower 48. The half light of coming dawn allowed me to barely see our five horses and two mules standing at attention seeking the source of the deep howl. Another wolf joined the chorus, this one further…

A Backcountry Recovery in Yellowstone: Adventures on Horseback (Part 2 of 5)

See “A Backcountry Recovery” Photo Gallery Getting ready for a long horse expedition always takes longer than expected. The morning we headed into the Teton Wilderness to meet veteran Green Beret Ray Knell and travel with him through Yellowstone was no exception. A common misconception is that horse journeys are easier than bicycling or backpacking…

A Backcountry Recovery in Yellowstone: Wilderness, Wild Horses, Warriors (Part 1 of 5)

Ray Knell, a Green Beret and Afghanistan war veteran, called me in January 2015 seeking advice on how to ride a thousand wilderness miles from Colorado to Montana along North America’s Continental Divide. Two years ago, I completed a 3,000-mile ride using wild mustangs across the American West as part of the documentary Unbranded, so…

Freedom to Move: Field Rhythm and Longtime Friends

My daily rhythm is typically a solo wandering in a wild landscape with crisp air and clean dirt. I feel super lucky to be able to spend a lot of time in the backcountry having experiences with wild animals, setting up camera traps, and photographing the rhythms of an animal migration. I’m a loner, and…

Freedom to Move: Camera Trapped

A remote camera trap is pretty simple. It’s just a normal DSLR camera connected to a motion trigger. I don’t push the shutter button, the animal trips an infrared beam, and then click, click, click. It’s really the only way to make intimate wide-angle pictures of wild animals without disturbing them. Pronghorn like to see…

Freedom to Move: Living Among the Greater Yellowstone Migrations

I love to think about the ever-evolving mixture of science, adventure, and conservation in the West. Old-school science is being combined with current-day media to reach the people that care—and who didn’t care. That’s my gig. I’m trained in wildlife biology and not in photography, but work as a photographer to tell wildlife and science…

Montana by Dirt: Road Tripping to Find New Adventures From Yellowstone to Glacier

Toyota 4Runner Trail with options shown. Through my camera’s viewfinder, the thin dirt road seemed to drive straight out of the white peaks of the Beartooth Mountains, blurred like some spectral mirage by the heat rising off the earth. I couldn’t imagine a better shot to illustrate how very much in the middle of nowhere…

Navigations: The Path of Apprenticeship

Read Mark Jenkins’s previous “Navigations” essays. I glide through the forest. As I sink into each turn, the powder rolls up my thighs. My skis carve crescents through the open firs, neither fast nor slow but with ease, like a looping stroke of calligraphy. This is my third ski tour in Yellowstone. Today I skied…