Tag archives for conservation

Home on the Ranch: Saddling Up With Hawaii’s Cowboys

I’m glad I didn’t ask the paniolos, or Hawaiian cowboys, to wear flower leis and cowboy hats. That’s a huge pet peeve of theirs. I was in Hawaii for the Waimea Ocean Film Festival, where I was showing Unbranded, a documentary I produced about four guys, included me, who rode 16 wild mustangs across the…

Watch: On a Tiny Island in one of the World’s Largest Lakes, Artists Explore Wilderness 

On undivided, uninhabited, undeveloped Rabbit Island, described as “a 90-acre speck amidst 3,000,000,000,000,000 gallons of fresh water,” a revolving ensemble of artists is contemplating our modern connection to nature in the Great Lakes country of Michigan. Photographer and climber Ben Moon recently brought his own artist’s eye to the island to create this short film. “My intent…

Watch: See What Inspired National Park Champion Doug Tompkins

Last week outdoor community icon and conservationist Doug Tompkins died in a kayaking accident in Chile (read “Insiders Recount Efforts to Save North Face Founder“). But his legacy and leadership will live on. Watch this tribute to see what inspired his work, then read memories from his friends, including adventurer Jeff Johnson, surfer Dan Malloy, and our…

Remembering the Grand Canyon’s Legendary Protector

It is just past six a.m. and the dawn rays are kissing a frothy spray dancing above the rapid ahead. The wind and hundred-plus desert temperatures are still sleeping. That reprieve of gusty, furnace-like heat tempers my nerves little. My mouth is desert dry thanks to adrenaline coursing through my body. I try to focus…

Monumental Decisions: What is Wilderness?

The long story of wilderness, national monuments, and how America’s public lands are going to change during the last year of the Obama Administration. In his famed 1862 essay “Walking,” Henry David Thoreau wrote: “In Wildness is the preservation of the World.” That sentiment has resonated through the American consciousness ever since. The legacy of…

Facing Setbacks, Extreme Swimmer Prepares for Last Chance at Most Southern Swim

Adventurer Lewis Pugh has one last chance to break the world record for the furthest south swim in history. But the Antarctic is not kind to those who seek to push themselves here. Pugh, 45, has experienced setbacks and unspeakable pain while on his quest to make five Antarctic swims. But that will not deter…

Adventurer to Attempt Extreme Swims to Protect Antarctic Seas—in Just a Speedo

A man in a Speedo is no match for a curious sea lion. Extreme swimmer Lewis Pugh and his team came to that conclusion pretty quickly last Friday when one of the massive marine mammals began to stalk Pugh less than 200 meters into a planned one-kilometer crawl in the waters of Campbell Island, located…

2,000 Miles to DC—By Canoe—to Protect the Boundary Waters

Adventure educators Amy and Dave Freeman arrived in Washington D.C. last Tuesday—by canoe. Over the past hundred days, the couple has paddled and portaged 2,000 miles from their home in Minnesota to our nation’s capitol, collecting signatures on their 20-foot fiberglass canoe to show their commitment to keeping the Boundary Waters Canoe Area wild. “When…

Our Canyon Lands Film Series Aims to Protect Our Wild West Backyard

“We are wild creatures, and if you remove wilderness from us, you take away our human spirit.” The story of Canyonlands National Park, and the lands that border it, is a complex tale of political horse trading, pressures for resource extraction, and recreational opportunities. It is also a story of the Wild West, of a rugged…

Paddling the “River of Doubt” 100 Years After Roosevelt

Dave Freeman and his wife Amy are two of our Adventurers of the Year. Read their profile here. A hundred years ago, Theodore Roosevelt, America’s “Rough Rider” president, descended an unmapped, rapids-choked tributary of the Amazon. He almost lost his life in the process and the legendary “River of Doubt” was renamed the Rio Roosevelt.…