Tag archives for climbing

Climbers Make History Scaling ‘Killer Mountain’

A multinational team of three climbers reached the summit of Nanga Parbat in Pakistan around 3:40 p.m. on February 26, signifying the first time the 8,126-meter (26,660-foot) mountain has been climbed in winter. Since 1988, at least 30 different expeditions comprised of some of the most experienced alpinists in the world have tried and failed to…

Making a National Parks Adventure: Behind the Scenes of the New IMAX Film

The wind was gusting at 40 miles an hour, carrying a fury of snow and ice crystals that felt like they were cutting into my face even through my wool mask. Temperatures with wind chill dipped below minus 30ºF, and my fingers had started to lose feeling even in puff mittens intended for climbers scaling…

How a Longtime Patagonia Climber Just Had His Best Season. Ever.

In the last two months, Colin Haley, 31, has squeezed in a lifetime’s worth of cutting-edge Patagonia alpinism. He’s logged speed records, solo records, and first ascents on virtually every major formation in Patagonia. When pioneering climbers Yvon Chouinard, Dick Dorworth, Lito Tejada-Flores, and the late Doug Tompkins, enjoyed their epic 1968 road trip from California…

Take Better Photos in the Mountains – Part 1

Like many “pros” out there, I’m a self-taught photographer—after all photography itself is not that complicated. Over the years I’ve become a lot more efficient at capturing the outdoors, but my style has never changed. Everyone has their own style, and that’s not something that should be force fed. But underneath every personal taste there are…

This Sherpa Woman Is Our Adventurer of the Year

Adventure is sometimes criticized as being selfish—the pursuits of privileged people with time to burn. At National Geographic, our definition of adventure is a broad one, spanning exploration and conservation, the pushing of the boundaries of human potential, cultural boundary breaking, community building, and humanitarianism. Our 2016 Adventurer of the Year honorees reflect this diversity, from…

Climbers Set Blistering Speed Record On Patagonia’s Torre Traverse

In an astonishing record time of 20 hours and 40 minutes, climbers Colin Haley and Alex Honnold on Monday completed the second ascent of the Torre Traverse—a north-to-south traverse of Patagonia’s Cerro Standhardt, Punta Herron, Torre Egger, and Cerro Torre. Their camp-to-camp time was 32 hours. Haley, 31, is beginning to see big dividends after…

Explore Mont Blanc Like a Superstar Athlete with Google’s New Street View

Ever dreamed of skiing iconic Mont Blanc, or climbing or even running to its summit? Why not do it today? Building on the recent Street View project that mapped the vertical walls of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park, Google has just released an immersive and interactive Street View of Mont Blanc. The world-famous peak is considered ground…

What Was Ropeless Climber Alex Honnold’s Closest Call?

When I called Alex Honnold for this interview, the first thing he asked was whether I had read his new book, Alone on the Wall, which he co-wrote with David Roberts.  I think he was fishing a bit because I’ve heard from a few people that he throws me (aka as “Mr. Safety”) under the…

Video: The Art of Climbing Castles in the Sky

World-class rock climber Sonnie Trotter takes us on his backyard quest, which resulted in Canada’s first multi-pitch 5.14, in this first film by photographer/climber Ben Moon (Denali, Rabbit Island), just released today. Castles in the Sky is a meditation on what inspires Trotter to seek what hasn’t been done and the process he uses to complete it. And now Trotter has…

A Climbing Phenom’s Life in (Mostly) His Own Words

In the fall of 2010 I spent most of a week with Alex Honnold at Smith Rock in Oregon, watching him climb and interviewing him for a profile for Outside. I was puzzled and amused by the apparent contradictions in Alex’s character: a raw brashness undercut by self-effacing modesty, his deadpan putdown of other climbers…