Tag archives for climbing

Read ongoing Everest coverage from National Geographic As we grapple with the tragic loss of 16 Sherpas in an avalanche in the infamous Khumbu Icefall on Mount Everest on April 18, we look to the Sherpa community help us better understand what they are experiencing. Karsang Sherpa now lives in Denver and works for a…

Make a donation and 100 percent of the proceeds got to support the Sherpa community. And you get a beautiful print as a thank you. More here: http://www.sherpasfund.org The echo of the massive avalanche that swept 16 climbers to their death last Sunday, April 18, while climbing through the Khumbu Icefall has been heard around the…

Climber and mountain guide Melissa Arnot has summited Everest five times. She is attempting two more summits in the 2014 season. She and Dave Morton co-founded The Juniper Fund. Everest is a beautiful and sacred place. Anyone would be hard pressed to disagree with that sentiment. Each season an international community pops up with a…

Austrian climber David Lama was transformed by his experience on Cerro Torre. As he said in his Adventurer of the Year profile, “Cerro Torre will always be a special mountain to me. It changed me from a sport climber into an alpinist.” After five expeditions to the region in order to complete the first free ascent…

See more about Everest. The 2014 Everest climbing season is upon us and teams have already begun their treks to base camp. Each season has its own surprises and headlines, with last year’s “Everest fight” stirring a media blitz. The 2014 season will see some  changes, with new regulations in place to attempt to reduce…

Even after all the magazine covers and films, Alex Honnold still lives in his van—though now it’s hooked up with solar power. And last week Alex and fellow climber Cedar Wright departed on a solar-focused adventure for Sufferfest 2—a month of biking, camping, and climbing through the Southwest that will culminate in bringing solar power to Navajo…

The first night of the 22nd Piolets d’Or, Kazakh climber Denis Urubko summed it up: Mountains (and oceans) are the last wild places on Earth. We go to these places to remember we are humans in nature, to seek lessons from the wild, and to get away from the trappings of human civilization. But as humans…

Cerro Torre is such a difficult climb that only the climbers themselves can document the upper reaches. “The more remote my expeditions became, the more important it was for  me to document them myself,” says 23-year-old Austrian climber David Lama. See what went into filming the Adventurer of the Year‘s historic first free ascent of Patagonia’s…

Climber Matt Moniz, with his dad Mike, climbed to all the highest points in the 50 states in 43 days, a feat which made him one of our Adventurers of the Year—and our youngest honored Adventurer ever. On April 3 I’m off to Nepal to begin an expedition I’ve been dreaming about most of my…

Climbing in Patagonia can be a weather waiting game. But when the conditions are unsuitable on the peaks, adventures abound in the climbing gateway town of El Chaltén, Argentina. Here we see David Lama, one of our 2013 Adventurers of the Year, enjoying a little R+R before making his historic first free ascent of Cerro…

I flicked the 10th leech from my left sock before noticing the blood soaking my midsection. Seven fat leeches had feasted there, and they were now dropping off one by one. But who can complain—this comes with the territory when you are in one of the earth’s last great rain forests. Surely it is worth…

Alex Honnold just did his first climb in Patagonia. And it was pretty spectacular. He teamed up with Tommy Caldwell to make the first ascent of the Fitz Traverse, which involved climbing seven peaks in five days along the Cerro Fitz Roy ridge line. Honnold and Caldwell waited for their weather window, then covered three miles…

We just heard back from Alex Honnold, who has been busy in Patagonia pulling off an epic feat of alpinism with Tommy Caldwell—a complete traverse of the Fitzroy Massif in five days. The Internet connection in Patagonia is so slow that Alex has not actually seen the video everyone is talking about of his ropeless…

We take our selection of the Adventurers of the Year very seriously. We want to find just the right mix of people who are pushing the boundaries of what’s possible in the world of adventure, whether that’s through feats of elite outdoor athleticism and exploration or giving back to the community in authentic ways. We…

Read Mark Jenkins’s previous “Navigations” essays. “The big day,” John said. “Yup,” I replied, rubbing my eyes. It was three in the morning. We were standing on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon aiming the beams of our headlamps down the South Kaibab Trail—a mule-stomped trough of glistening ice running between snowbanks. The trailhead…

The multifaceted Renan Ozturk, one of our previous Adventurers of the Year, has many stories to share—even more than we realized. We first came to know Renan years ago when he was a new North Face-sponsored climber who liked to paint and animate mountainscapes while on expeditions. That love of visuals and storytelling led him to…

We recently launched a new weekly video series called Zero to 60, a 60-second edit of cinematic adventure video released every Tuesday in partnership with our friends at Camp 4 Collective. This week’s video features climber Alex Honnold deep-water soloing in Oman, which is the subject of a feature story in the January 2014 issue…

Suffering for the Fun of It

This summer, The North Face climbers Cedar Wright and Alex Honnold decided to enchain all of California’s 14,000-foot peaks, which wouldn’t be that notable, except for the fact that they were going to try to do it without cars. Over the course of three epic weeks of pain and suffering, the quirky duo who—had never done…

The last time Dylan Taylor saw his climbing partner, Aiden, they were peering at each other from either side of a razor-wire fence between the border of Afghanistan and Tajikistan, having set out on a climbing expedition 36 days earlier. At the start, neither one of them imagined that the hardest challenge wouldn’t be a first…

I knew it was going to be a long trip before it even began on the day my Chinese visa was denied officially, after the Chinese Consulate had already sent it back to the agency two times prior. I’d been to China three times before and never had an issue, but this time around was…

Navigations: The Liberty of Silence

“Navigations,” a new column published twice a month, offers a deep dive into a great adventure story by writer Mark Jenkins. Jenkins, a seasoned climber and contributing writer to National Geographic, has been on 50 expeditions to more than 100 countries to cover adventure and geopolitical topics such as the war in the Afghanistan, climbing 8,000-meter peaks in…

While Hugh Jackman is being fawned over by a horde of reporters down the street, David Lama sits on a hotel patio in the midst of movie directors and European starlets awaiting his next interview. There is a stillness to him that draws the attention. He maintains a certain economy of movement that is almost…

Gripped, edges in on the 60-degree slope, and terrified beyond my wits, it slowly occurred to me that skiing Denali’s Rescue Couloir had not been the best idea in these conditions. Looking down the gullet of Rescue from just below 17,000-ft. camp, the idea of descending through the thin chute, lined with jagged shale incisors…

I took a deep breath of the thin air at 5,500 meters (18,000 feet) and scanned the beautiful scene of jagged rocks, sparkling white snow, and deep blue glacier ice around me and slowly became more comfortable in my thought that we would not reach the peak of Ausangate. This is always a hard decision…

Anyone who thinks that the climbing of Denali is a picnic is badly mistaken. –Hudson Stuck, one of the first four men to reach the summit of Denali on June 7, 1913 On June 8, a team of 14 climbers, skiers, and friends—myself included—set out from Talkeetna into the Alaska Range with the intent of…