Tag archives for biking

Navigations: Laisvé

It is one of the great regrets of travel: You meet someone on a journey, come to know them intimately in just a few hours, then never see them again. You promise to keep in touch, but it seldom happens. When you return home, your own life takes over, and so does theirs, and the…

Climbers Alex Honnold, Cedar Wright Add Solar to Sufferfest 2

Even after all the magazine covers and films, Alex Honnold still lives in his van—though now it’s hooked up with solar power. And last week Alex and fellow climber Cedar Wright departed on a solar-focused adventure for Sufferfest 2—a month of biking, camping, and climbing through the Southwest that will culminate in bringing solar power to Navajo…

Fatbikes Are for Beaches, Too

With fatbike sales anticipated to double in 2014 and macro manufacturers like Specialized jumping into the market, it’s safe to say the fat revolution is here to stay. Originally tagged as a winter bike relegated for those with a kennel of Huskies in the back 40, the plus-size ride opens opportunities for people living in…

Fatbiking 100 Miles Along Oregon’s Coast

The Oregon coast runs 360+ miles from Brookings to the Columbia River watershed. And fortunately for the people, the 1967 Oregon Beach Bill granted easement to all of it. That doesn’t mean it’s all readily accessible, though. Oregon’s long stretches of sandy beaches are interrupted by rivers, bays, and rocky capes that cliff out into the foamy surf. And…

Suffering for the Fun of It

This summer, The North Face climbers Cedar Wright and Alex Honnold decided to enchain all of California’s 14,000-foot peaks, which wouldn’t be that notable, except for the fact that they were going to try to do it without cars. Over the course of three epic weeks of pain and suffering, the quirky duo who—had never done…

Alaska’s Lost Coast: Dog Sharks, Bears, and Cape Fairweather

See Cameron Lawson’s previous dispatches on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> Thousands of dead dog sharks are scattered along the beach from a high tide that vanished hours ago. The sun is intense today and the fish are literally baking in the heat. Wafts of decay fill the salt air as we weave around twisted carcasses…

Alaska’s Lost Coast: The Mighty River and Mountain Sanctuary

See Cameron Lawson’s previous dispatches on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> With our bikes strapped tightly to the bow, we wedge ourselves into puny Alpacka rafts, and get ready to cross the mighty Alsek, an enormous river that empties into Dry Bay at an average flow of 80,000 cubic feet per minute. Before shoving off, we…

Alaska’s Lost Coast: Follow the Yellow Brick Road

Iris runs her finger along the wrinkled topographic map as we get our bearings along the Lost Coast approximately 50 miles southeast of the Yakutat airport. The maps were produced in 1961, and we soon discover that some of the features—such as rivers—have shifted, dried up, or been replaced with dense vegetation. “Hey Cam, the…

Alaska’s Lost Coast: Welcome to the Last Frontier

See Cameron Lawson’s previous dispatches on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> A twinge of nervous energy flowed through my body as I entered the small, metal airport terminal in Yakutat in search of my companion for the Lost Coast expedition ahead. Amongst a dispersed crowd of tourists dressed in chic outdoor gear and a handful of…

Alaska’s Lost Coast by Bike and Packraft: Blind Date, Alaska Style

Read Cameron’s previous posts on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> Before departing for Alaska’s Lost Coast, my partner and I had never met, and we certainly didn’t know if we’d make good traveling companions. We had a 200-mile journey through remote Alaskan wilderness ahead of us, and we both had a lot of questions brewing in…