Tag archives for biking

On June 22, 2013, Felix Starck set out on the journey of a lifetime.  His goal was quite simple really: to pedal his bike around the globe.  Over the next 365 days Felix would ride nearly 11,200 miles through 22 countries and live on to tell the tale.  His new film Pedal the World, an…

Taking action looks different for everyone. For Shannon Galpin, her action takes the form of empowering women and girls in conflict regions and her vehicle of change is the bicycle. In 2008, Shannon, a National Geographic Adventurer of the Year, traveled to Afghanistan for the first time. Since then she has been the first woman to ride…

“The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.” — Susan B. Anthony in 1986 In Afghanistan it’s not technically illegal to ride a bicycle, but a woman riding a bicycle is a deep-seeded taboo and is seen as controversial, provocative, and immoral. In this video, Shannon Galpin, a National Geographic…

Michigan: A Grand Adventure

Tour Grand Island on foot, by bike, and by kayak. What Is It? Grand Island, located a quick boat ride from the bustling town of Munising, boasts spectacular scenery, rich history, and countless recreational opportunities. Take advantage of all this island has to offer with a multisport weekend camping adventure featuring hiking, biking, paddling, and…

Florida: Bike Big Shoals Country

Tour the diverse terrain along the Suwannee River on bicycle. What Is It? This ride combs through the hidden gem of Big Shoals Conservation Area and can be 5 to 25 miles, depending on your energy level. We definitely recommend cycling at least the ten-mile loop along the Suwannee River that starts from the Little…

Explore the Ouachita Mountains on foot, by mountain bike, or with fishing rod in hand. What Is It? Located in west-central Arkansas, the Ouachita offer a weekend full of options and a setting for being as active or as relaxed as you wish. The Ouachita Trail boasts 222 miles of sweet single-track perfect for riding…

Navigations: Laisvé

It is one of the great regrets of travel: You meet someone on a journey, come to know them intimately in just a few hours, then never see them again. You promise to keep in touch, but it seldom happens. When you return home, your own life takes over, and so does theirs, and the…

Even after all the magazine covers and films, Alex Honnold still lives in his van—though now it’s hooked up with solar power. And last week Alex and fellow climber Cedar Wright departed on a solar-focused adventure for Sufferfest 2—a month of biking, camping, and climbing through the Southwest that will culminate in bringing solar power to Navajo…

Fatbikes Are for Beaches, Too

With fatbike sales anticipated to double in 2014 and macro manufacturers like Specialized jumping into the market, it’s safe to say the fat revolution is here to stay. Originally tagged as a winter bike relegated for those with a kennel of Huskies in the back 40, the plus-size ride opens opportunities for people living in…

The Oregon coast runs 360+ miles from Brookings to the Columbia River watershed. And fortunately for the people, the 1967 Oregon Beach Bill granted easement to all of it. That doesn’t mean it’s all readily accessible, though. Oregon’s long stretches of sandy beaches are interrupted by rivers, bays, and rocky capes that cliff out into the foamy surf. And…

Suffering for the Fun of It

This summer, The North Face climbers Cedar Wright and Alex Honnold decided to enchain all of California’s 14,000-foot peaks, which wouldn’t be that notable, except for the fact that they were going to try to do it without cars. Over the course of three epic weeks of pain and suffering, the quirky duo who—had never done…

See Cameron Lawson’s previous dispatches on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> Thousands of dead dog sharks are scattered along the beach from a high tide that vanished hours ago. The sun is intense today and the fish are literally baking in the heat. Wafts of decay fill the salt air as we weave around twisted carcasses…

See Cameron Lawson’s previous dispatches on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> With our bikes strapped tightly to the bow, we wedge ourselves into puny Alpacka rafts, and get ready to cross the mighty Alsek, an enormous river that empties into Dry Bay at an average flow of 80,000 cubic feet per minute. Before shoving off, we…

Iris runs her finger along the wrinkled topographic map as we get our bearings along the Lost Coast approximately 50 miles southeast of the Yakutat airport. The maps were produced in 1961, and we soon discover that some of the features—such as rivers—have shifted, dried up, or been replaced with dense vegetation. “Hey Cam, the…

See Cameron Lawson’s previous dispatches on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> A twinge of nervous energy flowed through my body as I entered the small, metal airport terminal in Yakutat in search of my companion for the Lost Coast expedition ahead. Amongst a dispersed crowd of tourists dressed in chic outdoor gear and a handful of…

Read Cameron’s previous posts on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> Before departing for Alaska’s Lost Coast, my partner and I had never met, and we certainly didn’t know if we’d make good traveling companions. We had a 200-mile journey through remote Alaskan wilderness ahead of us, and we both had a lot of questions brewing in…

In late July, writer-photographer-adventurer Cameron Lawson and a near stranger will use fat-tired bikes and packrafts to travel approximately 350 miles along Alaska’s Lost Coast. Getting from Yakutat to Juneau will take 14 to 17 days. The majority of this adventure is highly isolated and void of civilization and will entail lots of beach riding,…

In late July, writer-photographer-adventurer Cameron Lawson and a new friend will use fat-tired bikes and packrafts to travel approximately 350 miles along Alaska’s Lost Coast. Getting from Yakutat to Juneau will take 14 to 17 days. The majority of this adventure is highly isolated and void of civilization and will entail lots of beach riding,…

From high atop the Shomali Plain north of Kabul, National Geographic Adventurer of the Year Shannon Galpin lets go of the brake levers. She aims her bike straight down the deserted road through the flatlands. Four young Afghan women—members of the country’s first female bike race team—do the same. As the small peloton picks up…

Real adventure is not polished. When I first met Kyle Dempster he blew me away. He was embarking on the kind of adventures I think are the most important. Lots of heart, creativity, and curiosity. They were of his own making, not sponsors. This is his story. Please share. This is what you can do…

Each Thursday in June we’ll be featuring a different film from the MoveShake film series. This week’s film is about Shannon Galpin, founder of Mountain2Mountain and a 2013 Adventurer of the Year. When you meet Shannon Galpin, you’re immediately affected by the glowing energy that fuels her work with her nonprofit, Mountain2Mountain. Mountain2Mountain focuses on improving women’s…

“I forgot to pack my underwear, but I brought a headlamp!” said Winnie. By now we had known each other five days. We were in a remote, Costa Rican jungle and I couldn’t help but laugh at my new Swedish friend and expedition mate. Her parents named her after the loveable children’s character and bear,…

Jim Harris is currently on a National Geographic Expeditions Council assignment with Gregg Treinish to look for wolverine DNA evidence in Mongolia. Read updates on the expedition here. Windmilling his kayak paddle into the pushy breeze, Luc Mehl, 34, pulls onto the sandbar at the mouth of Mexico’s Rio Antigua and squints at the novelty…

Action adventure film highlights from the Banff Mountain Film Festival are making their way across North America and around the world in the 2013 Radical Reels Tour. Though the order may vary by venue the series includes 11 movies that sweep the action sports spectrum. “This year’s tour includes films about climbing, skiing, snowboarding, mountain…

After polar explorer Eric Larsen finished on the “triple crown of adventure”—traveling to the South Pole, the North Pole, and the top of Mount Everest in one year—it was hard to imagine what he might do next. But he has a plan. In December of 2012, Larson will begin another crossing of Antarctica. Once again…