Tag archives for antarctica

In the modern era of adventure sports and exploration it should be no surprise that one of the world’s leading freeride snowboarders would seek out the most extreme alpine lines on the planet. In 2012, when champion slope shredder Xavier De Le Rue set his sights on the continent of Antarctica, he was looking for…

Pick up the September 2013 edition of National Geographic to read writer Freddie Wilkinson’s feature story about this expedition. Queen Maud Land—the adventure starts in sun-soaked South Africa in late spring. On the evening of November 11, 2012, a little after dinner hours, a group of men steadily forms in the back corner of the departures terminal…

After polar explorer Eric Larsen finished on the “triple crown of adventure”—traveling to the South Pole, the North Pole, and the top of Mount Everest in one year—it was hard to imagine what he might do next. But he has a plan. In December of 2012, Larson will begin another crossing of Antarctica. Once again…

Crossing the Ice was clearly a stand out favorite this year at the Banff Mountain Film Festival. Taking home the trophy for Best Film on Exploration and Adventure, The People’s Choice Award, and the Grand Prize, this documentary affirms the notion that, at their core, the truly great stories of our time reflect the very…

Ultra trail runner and adventurer Lizzy Hawker wins the holy grail of epic trail races for the fifth time. Vote for Lizzy Hawker for the People’s Choice Adventurer of the Year See photos of all ten Adventurers of the Year in action! When Lizzy Hawker first entered the famed Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (UTMB), a staggering…

“Great God! This is an awful place,” wrote Robert Falcon Scott in his diary on January 17, 1912. Just hours before, Scott and his four companions had reached the South Pole, only to discover that Roald Amundsen’s team had beaten them there by a month. Nine weeks later, doomed by a combination of starvation, scurvy,…

By David Roberts; Photograph by London News/Getty Images It was the strangest of all races. Two teams of five men each—one British, the other Norwegian—set out at the beginning of the 1911 Antarctic summer, both bent on becoming the first explorers to reach the South Pole. The British team was led by 43-year-old Robert Falcon…

Photograph courtesy of First Ascent / Jake Norton. See photographs from Viesturs Everest expedition. Tomorrow we will officially announce the sixth annual Adventurers of the Year, each honored for their remarkable achievements in the world of adventure. Back in 2005, alpinist Ed Viesturs was named our very first Adventurer of the Year, a title he…

The Amundsen Mystery Still Unsolved

The more than 80-year-old mystery of the disappearance of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen and his airplane remains unsolved, as New Zealand explorer Rob McCallum and his team returned from their two-week search for the aircraft empty-handed.  

Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, best known for his pioneering visit to the South Pole and sail through the Northwest Passage, disappeared in 1928 when his plane went down during a mission to rescue Italian explorer Umberto Nobile. Only a wing float and a fuel tank from his aircraft, the French twin-engine flying boat Latham 47, were…

Their tragic ordeal was immortalized in Apsley Cherry-Garrard’s The Worst Journey in the World (ranked our #1 favorite adventure book of all time): In 1911 three Brits slogged 130 miles across Antarctica’s Ross Island in the pitch-black, blow-high-hell dead of the polar winter. And all for the unlikely prize of three emperor penguin eggs. And now…

Text by Laura Buckley We now have 40 Wild Chronicles videos, hosted by National Geographic's own Boyd Matson, up on our site. In each episode, top explorers and field scientists traverse the globe, from Antarctica to Iceland, to report on the state of the natural world. One of our favorites is "Antarctic Orca Hunting"—not because we particularly enjoy watching…

Text by Contributing Editor Jon Bowermaster. Read more at his blog, Notes From Sea Level. Photograph by Contributing Photographer Peter McBride Even as more of the Wilkins Ice Shelf in Antarctica threatens to crumble, in part due to warming temperatures, man’s influence on the continent is being heavily debated during these next two weeks in…

Text by Tetsuhiko EndoFeeling like your job has got you stuck in a rut?  At least you aren’t doing circles in the Southern Ocean like Olly Hicks, 26, who is 12 days into his attempt at the first rowing circumnavigation of Antarctica—and literally going backwards due to a strong headwind reports The Adventure Blog. This…

Text by Tetsuhiko Endo On Januray 7, a trio of Canadians claimed to have completed their trek across Antarctica to the South Pole in a record breaking 33 days 23 hours and 30 minutes, according to  explorersweb.com. Their new record would outstrip the one set earlier this season by American Todd Carmichael (39 days 7…

National Geographic ADVENTURE contributing editor Jon Bowermaster has returned to Antarctica this season, after last year’s five-week-long expedition by sea kayak and sailboat ("The White Continent Heats Up," November 2008). Wtihin days of his arrival, a tourist boat ran aground along the Antarctic Peninsula, the M/V Ushuaia, showing the world just how treacherous the waters…

Text by Ryan Bradley Werner Herzog’s latest film, Encounters at the End of the World, recently opened nationwide. It is a documentary about Antarctica—specifically about McMurdo Station, headquarters of the National Science Foundation (which helped fund the film), and the people living and working in this community of 1,100 at the bottom of the planet.…