Tag archives for alaska

Alaska: Hike Lost Lake

  Find your bliss in the Land of the Midnight Sun by backpacking one of the most scenic trails on the Kenai Peninsula. What Is It? This 15-mile moderately challenging point-to-point route begins at mile post 5 on the Seward Highway and climbs 2,000 feet. After the first 7.5 miles, you’ll link up with the…

Mountain endurance athlete Kilian Jornet set a new speed record on 20,322-foot Mount McKinley, or Denali, in Alaska, on June 7, 2014. The 26-year-old Catalonian’s ascent and descent took 11 hours and 48 minutes, which was five hours faster than the previous record of 16 hours 46 minutes set by Ed Warren in 2013. Jornet used skis…

See Cameron Lawson’s previous dispatches on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> Thousands of dead dog sharks are scattered along the beach from a high tide that vanished hours ago. The sun is intense today and the fish are literally baking in the heat. Wafts of decay fill the salt air as we weave around twisted carcasses…

See Cameron Lawson’s previous dispatches on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> With our bikes strapped tightly to the bow, we wedge ourselves into puny Alpacka rafts, and get ready to cross the mighty Alsek, an enormous river that empties into Dry Bay at an average flow of 80,000 cubic feet per minute. Before shoving off, we…

Iris runs her finger along the wrinkled topographic map as we get our bearings along the Lost Coast approximately 50 miles southeast of the Yakutat airport. The maps were produced in 1961, and we soon discover that some of the features—such as rivers—have shifted, dried up, or been replaced with dense vegetation. “Hey Cam, the…

See Cameron Lawson’s previous dispatches on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> A twinge of nervous energy flowed through my body as I entered the small, metal airport terminal in Yakutat in search of my companion for the Lost Coast expedition ahead. Amongst a dispersed crowd of tourists dressed in chic outdoor gear and a handful of…

Gripped, edges in on the 60-degree slope, and terrified beyond my wits, it slowly occurred to me that skiing Denali’s Rescue Couloir had not been the best idea in these conditions. Looking down the gullet of Rescue from just below 17,000-ft. camp, the idea of descending through the thin chute, lined with jagged shale incisors…

Read Cameron’s previous posts on Alaska’s Lost Coast >> Before departing for Alaska’s Lost Coast, my partner and I had never met, and we certainly didn’t know if we’d make good traveling companions. We had a 200-mile journey through remote Alaskan wilderness ahead of us, and we both had a lot of questions brewing in…

Anyone who thinks that the climbing of Denali is a picnic is badly mistaken. –Hudson Stuck, one of the first four men to reach the summit of Denali on June 7, 1913 On June 8, a team of 14 climbers, skiers, and friends—myself included—set out from Talkeetna into the Alaska Range with the intent of…

In late July, writer-photographer-adventurer Cameron Lawson and a near stranger will use fat-tired bikes and packrafts to travel approximately 350 miles along Alaska’s Lost Coast. Getting from Yakutat to Juneau will take 14 to 17 days. The majority of this adventure is highly isolated and void of civilization and will entail lots of beach riding,…

In late July, writer-photographer-adventurer Cameron Lawson and a new friend will use fat-tired bikes and packrafts to travel approximately 350 miles along Alaska’s Lost Coast. Getting from Yakutat to Juneau will take 14 to 17 days. The majority of this adventure is highly isolated and void of civilization and will entail lots of beach riding,…

The draw of the distant and inhospitable peaks of this world is in my blood. My father Alex Lowe and now stepfather Conrad Anker have enough first accents, daring rescues, and cardinal accomplishments in the high mountains all over the world to outdo most anyone in the history of the climbing. For a young man…

Expedition Denali Short from Distill Productions, LLC on Vimeo. I’ve been told it shouldn’t matter. But as one in a handful of black professionals in the outdoor recreation industry, I can’t help being wildly excited. In June the first team of African-American climbers will attempt to reach the summit of Alaska’s Mount McKinley, the tallest…

See previous dispatches >> A cold, dark winter subsides as the days grow longer and the sun’s rays intensify. The inevitable change in seasons triggers an innate response in all living creatures—bears awake from hibernation, birds take flight, and fish swim upstream. Migration is a matter of survival for certain animal species while select humans…

After a summer of training hard in Washington’s Cascade Range, British Columbia’s Waddington Range, and Alaska’s Chugach Range, the Expedition Denali team is poised to embark on their journey to Denali in June 2013. This film clip will give you a brief window into their training this past summer and their thoughts on the upcoming…

NOLS is training the Expedition Denali team for their 2013 attempt to summit Denali. With the help of Climb Strong, we’ve set up a rigorous fitness regimen that will whip the team into shape. They’ve already established a base level of fitness and have started building it up with a simple 30-minute metabolic workout. Follow…

By Contributing Writer Aparna Rajagopal-Durbin, Faculty member and Diversity & Inclusion Manager at the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) On June 7, 1913, Alaska Native Walter Harper was the first person to summit Denali, the highest peak in North America. And though the face of our nation has evolved from mostly white to a mosaic…

By Tetsuhiko Endo; Photograph by Bob Hallinen, Landov, see more adventurers in our Ultimate Adventurers gallery. The long, cold winter is winding down for most of us, but in Alaska, they are gearing up for one last hurrah. That’s right, the 86th Iditarod kicks off March 6. The dogsledding race goes from Anchorage to Nome,…

Photograph by Michael Christopher Brown. See the story, photos, and map in the March issue of National Geographic Magazine. About a year ago, Andrew Skurka embarked on the hardest expedition of his life—4,679 miles of skiing, hiking, and packrafting in wildest Alaska and the Yukon. You probably recall his thoughtful blog dispatches on this website.…

Here Andrew Skurka answers your questions about his 4,700-mile Alaska-Yukon Expedition.See a photo gallery from the expedition and watch for the article in National Geographic Magazine in spring 2011. 1. What would you do without your mother? — George Eichman III My mother is certainly an integral and critical part of my trips, though my father should get some…

  We've just updated our popular America's Best Adventures feature with 50 new trips, bringing our grand total to 100 iconic escapes (see the map, state-by-state list, and photo gallery, too). So no matter what your pleasure—hiking, heli-skiing, surfing, climbing, biking, or paddling—we've got the perfect adventure for you. Check in each day for a…

  We've just updated our popular America's Best Adventures feature with 50 new trips, bringing our grand total to 100 iconic escapes (see the map, state-by-state list, and photo gallery, too). So no matter what your pleasure—hiking, heli-skiing, surfing, climbing, biking, or paddling—we've got the perfect adventure for you. Check in each day for a…

  We've just updated our popular America's Best Adventures feature with 50 new trips, bringing our grand total to 100 iconic escapes (see the map, state-by-state list, and photo gallery, too). So no matter what your pleasure—hiking, heli-skiing, surfing, climbing, biking, or paddling—we've got the perfect adventure for you. Check in each day for a…

By Andrew Skurka, written from Boulder, Colorado, after finishing his 4,700-mile Alaska-Yukon Expedition See a photo gallery from the expedition and watch for the article in National Geographic Magazine in spring 2011. This past weekend, just two weeks after finishing my trip, I moved back to the exceptional city of Boulder, Colorado. My life does…

On many days during his Alaska-Yukon Expedition, Andrew Skurka would take just one long break for about an hour in the early afternoon. This was an opportunity to dry his feet and gear, to make notes on his maps, and to take a cat nap to re-energize for another long push to camp. See the…