Category archives for Wildlife

Chuck Yaeger stops by my tent at 4:30 a.m. Yaeger, a wild elephant that occasionally roams the Elephant Watch Camp for its tree snacks (seed pods), is a large bull. He is five feet from my head. I lay flat and quiet. Elephants can smell but have poor eyesight. A powerful step or sweep of…

By Andy Maser; Photographs by Andy Maser and Trip Jennings, Elephant Ivory Project, EP Films We were recovering at our Obenge base camp when we heard the strange screams. “Pardon Papa! Pardon Papa!” over and over again, with a sound like bamboo being chopped down prompting each yell. Effrin, a local guide, pointed to the…

By Trip Jennings and Kyle Dickman; Photographs courtesy Kyle Dickman, Skip Brown, and Terese Hart We just arrived this morning and I already want to leave Kisangani, a city of 700,000 in the center of Congo’s jungle. A cholera outbreak started in the city last week and left 27 dead—200 more cases have been reported.…

By Kyle Dickman and Trip Jennings; Photographs by Andy Maser It's been a fortunate few days. We arrived in Kinshasa on Monday exhausted from 36 hours of transit and found the Congo just as hot as we left it two years ago. On Tuesday morning, we met with Dr. Teresa Hart, a 30-year veteran of…

By Kyle Dickman and Trip JenningsToday, I'm packing. After two years in the works, we’re kicking off the Elephant Ivory Project in earnest on Sunday morning when Andy Maser and I fly to Kinshasha, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, with a case of collection vials and the goal of saving a…

  Connecting the Gems is a new project conceived by Deia Schlosberg and Gregg Treinish, who were Adventurers of the Year in 2008 for their remarkable trans-Andes traverse. Here Gregg Treinish shares details about their upcoming 450-mile hike through Lewis and Clark's Rockies. The Northern Rockies of the United States are one of the most…

Today adventurer Andrew Skurka begins an ambitious, seven-month expedition that will take him 4,720 miles across Alaska and the Yukon by skis, foot, and raft. Follow his blog dispatches here and his tweets via twitter.com/andrewskurka. The contents of my pack are almost entirely need based. During this trip, my legitimate needs will include staying hydrated…

On Thursday Andrew Skurka arrived 30 miles north of the Arctic Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska, to begin his latest expedition. Similar to his Great Western Loop hike (a feat which made him our 2008 Adventurer of the Year), this is an ambitious, never-before-attempted endeavor. For the next seven months, he'll cover more than 4,720 miles…

For our annual Adventure Travel issue, we scoured the globe to find the 25 Best New Trips in the World for 2010, complete with a Best Trips photo gallery. Today, we present Sri Lanka. The world’s far corners are now well within reach. SRI LANKA: MIA No More After the tsunami of 2004 and the resolution of a…

For our annual Adventure Travel issue, we scoured the globe to find the 25 Best New Trips in the World for 2010, complete with a Best Trips photo gallery. Today, we present Slovakia. The world’s far corners are now well within reach. SLOVAKIA: Tracking a Wild Pack Thirteen years ago, British biologist Robin Rigg ventured into Slovakia’s Carpathian…

For our annual Adventure Travel issue, we scoured the globe to find the 25 Best New Trips in the World for 2010, complete with a Best Trips photo gallery. Today, we present Madagascar. The world's far corners are now well within reach. MADAGASCAR: Sail the Indian Ocean Known for its 70-plus species of lemurs, Madagascar…

For our annual Adventure Travel issue, we scoured the globe to find the 25 Best New Trips in the World for 2010, complete with a Best Trips photo gallery. Today, we present Kenya. The world's far corners are now well within reach. KENYA: Save the King! Lion kills cow, Maasai warrior kills lion. It’s a…

As of today, Baobab Expeditions (see our rating of the company) is offering an 11-day private gorilla and rhino safari in Rwanda and Kenya, led by the most impressive of experts: Dr. Clare Richardson, president of the venerable Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International. An authority on gorilla research, she'll take you mountain gorilla tracking and…

We don't normally advocate for armchair adventures over the real thing, but when the National Geographic Channel's Expedition Week starts up November 15th, we highly recommend a snagging a front row seat. You'll be searching for Amazon headshrinkers and tagging great white sharks…from the comforts of your living room. And, for the first time, you can help…

The locals living along Kenya's Diani Beach have their own name for the whale sharks that peacefully troll their waters. They call these mysterious creatures papa shillingi, meaning “shark covered in shillings.” According to them, God was so amazed by their beauty that he had angels throw gold and silver coins down on the gentle…

With bushmeat trade on the rise and gorillas the decline, there's never been a better time to make the trek to Africa to check out these wild yet humanlike beasts for yourself. Let's face it, in a few more years, you may not have the chance. An undercover investigation conducted by Endangered Species International recently revealed that…

Making the pilgrimage to Uganda or Rwanda to see the mountain gorillas, admired for their humanlike mannerisms and massive grace, is one of the greatest adventure trips around. In fact, it's a trip we regularly feature in the pages of ADVENTURE, in part because the high cost, low-volume tourism model helps protect the natural environment of…

Paul Kvinta on Man Vs. Nature

Yesterday, it became legal to kill a wolf in Idaho. A state-sanctioned wolf hunt began amid controversy, seeing as wolves were removed from the endangered species list only four months ago. There’s a good back and forth between Idaho hunters and conservationists here. Contributing Editor Paul Kvinta has covered interspecies conflicts like this one for…

It turns out, movies can make a difference. Richard O'Barry, the dolphin trainer turned dolphin activist who is the central character in the documentary The Cove, announced this yesterday: Today is September 1st, the first day of the dolphin slaughter season in Japan. But when I arrived today by bus from Kansai Airport with media…

Kenya’s wild lions could be annihilated within 20 years, according to the Kenya Wildlife Service. For almost a decade, the country has been losing 100 big cats a year, and the current population of 2,000 could be gone by 2030. Conservationists are blaming habitat destruction, animal disease, and conflict with humans for the rapid decline…

Their tragic ordeal was immortalized in Apsley Cherry-Garrard’s The Worst Journey in the World (ranked our #1 favorite adventure book of all time): In 1911 three Brits slogged 130 miles across Antarctica’s Ross Island in the pitch-black, blow-high-hell dead of the polar winter. And all for the unlikely prize of three emperor penguin eggs. And now…

We reported last month that the entire population of tigers in the Panna Tiger Reserve in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh has been completely decimated by poachers. But now, the good guys have some points on the board. On August 13, the Wildlife Conservation Society announced two successful raids, and numerous arrests by…

Text by Annie Hay Here's the latest from Ed Wardle, who voluntarily wound up in the Canadian Yukon, alone, unsupported, for three months for the National Geographic Channel's new TV show, Alone in the Wild. Currently just 38 days into his journey, the show is revolutionizing reality television. Gone are the days of waiting for the…

Text by Joe Battle Wind turbines undoubtedly help tap a great renewable energy resource, but what about ocean turbines? In a recent CNN article ("Is the ocean Florida's untapped energy source?"), this idea could potentially solve Florida's energy issues. Florida Atlantic University is researching the benefits, cost, and effects of turbines placed in the Gulf…

Text by Alyson Sheppard; Photograph: Wolcott Henry, National Geographic Animals Populations of lionfish, a football-size predatory fish native to the Indian and Pacific Oceans, are exploding in coral reefs in the Bahamas, threatening to destroy native fish schools and the local snorkeling, diving, and kayaking businesses. Continue reading this story >>