Category archives for Adventurers of the Year

A Year in the Wilderness: Hauling Over Thin Ice – Week 10, Post #5

The cold stung my face as I opened the tent and stepped into the inky blackness. Stars dotted the sky and the ice sang as it grew, emitting low muffled, pulsing groans into the still night air. I grabbed the axe and headed down to the lake. My headlamp’s narrow beam illuminated wolf tracks on…

Climate Change Could Melt the $60 Billion Snow Sports Industry. Can COP21 Make a Difference?

Winter sports is a $60 billion industry that props up 900,000 U.S. jobs, but because of climate change it could be melting away before our eyes. Since the 1960s the Northern Hemisphere has lost nearly a million miles of spring snow cover and that trend shows no signs of stopping. “Even if we stopped everything…

A Year in the Wilderness: Thanksgiving in the Boundary Waters – Week 9, Post #4

Our 65th day in the Boundary Waters gave us an excuse to celebrate on two accounts. We mused over breakfast that we will be in the Wilderness for 300 more days. More importantly, we were celebrating Thanksgiving in the Wilderness. We have been looking forward to Thanksgiving for several weeks and the stuff sack full…

A Year in the Wilderness: Howling Wolves Remind Us We Are Only Visitors – Week 7, Post #3

The lake’s glassy surface beckoned us, so after setting up our camp we slid the canoe back in the water for a quick paddle as the sun set. We pulled our canoe up on shore and were about to continue our camp chores when a pack of wolves broke the silence with a chorus of…

500 Miles Through Water-Starved Outback Tests Adventurer’s Abilities

In the days and weeks after September 6, National Geographic explorer Sarah Marquis developed the odd habit of walking to her refrigerator, opening the door, and browsing through its contents. Then, closing the door, and she would go back about her day. Because the 43-year-old Swiss adventurer, who became a 2014 Nat Geo Adventurer of…

A Year in the Wilderness: Week 4, Post #1

Yesterday morning I poked my head out of the tent and found a thin, white blanket of snow. It was the first snowfall of the season in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in Northern Minnesota– another milestone in the slow and steady transition between fall and winter. My wife, Amy Freeman, and I have…

Ski Resort or Sacred Mountain? Film Shows the Fight for Jumbo

“When we’re in the wild, we’re able to contemplate a world much greater than ourselves,” says Sweetgrass Productions filmmaker Nick Waggoner about his latest and most ambitious film, Jumbo Wild. In a format simlar to last year’s DamNation, also underwritten by Patagonia, which examined the role of non-productive, “deadbeat” dams in the U.S., Jumbo Wild explores the hotly contested…

Make Adventure, Not War: Promoting Goodwill and Contributing to Peace

I believe that adventure can save the world. I get there are a number of really huge problems out there that we need to solve: ensuring women’s rights, access to education, access to clean water, ending hunger, stopping malaria, dealing with climate change, eliminating HIV, stopping species and habitat loss, minimizing extractive industries, etc. I…

Yosemite Climber Tommy Caldwell Speaks on Risk, Reward, and Life After the Dawn Wall

The Dawn Wall was the climb heard and seen around the world. Over 19 grueling days last January, Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson achieved their seven-year pursuit of free-climbing the hardest multi-pitch route in the world: the 3,000-foot Dawn Wall of El Capitan. (Read: “Duo Completes First Free Climb of Yosemite’s Dawn Wall, Making History”)…

Climber Comedian: Alex Honnold on Being Funny, Filmming His Own Climbs, What’s Next

Who would’ve guessed that Alex Honnold was so funny? Yet it’s this celebrated California free soloist, known his daring ropeless ascents in Yosemite and elsewhere, who is responsible for making REEL ROCK 10, the annual worldwide tour of climbing films from Sender Films and Big Up Productions, perhaps the funniest year yet. “This year’s program…