Hailing from Maine's rocky coast, Kyle is an environmental scientist with an interest at the landscape scale. With more than two years living, studying, and working in Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam, Kyle has focused on issues ranging from forest carbon conservation to migratory fish tracking; from rural stakeholder mapping to low emission agriculture practices.

At the UC Berkeley Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, Kyle is pursuing graduate research at the interface of landscape and climate. Kyle plans to find ways to better characterize ecosystem dynamics in managed agriculture, forest, and working-land systems for use in low emission development, integrated ecosystem restoration, and climate change adaptation programs.

Biking the Slow Road from China to Laos – Part 5/5

With additional writing by Will Stauffer-Norris  In five or ten years, we will come back to this place and zip from Kunming to Luang Prabang in mere hours on the new train. Maybe we will take a houseboat out for a spin on one of the Nam Ou dam reservoirs, or a zip line from peak…

Biking Along a Soon-to-Be-Dammed River in Laos – Part 4/5

With additional writing by Will Stauffer-Norris  Running the length of remote northern Laos’ Phongsali Province, the Nam Ou River is one of the Mekong’s largest tributaries. But the river that provides vital dietary protein and transport to people throughout this largely roadless watershed is about to be transformed. The Lao government has contracted a Chinese company…

Pedaling Along Power Lines in Northern Laos – Part 3/5

What would Daohu think? This question stuck with us through the days and weeks after meeting such an ambitious and inquisitive Hmong youth, at 3,600 feet, on the side of a mountain. We were seated in miniature plastic chairs, eating cucumber, the only alternative to the ubiquitous processed Chinese snacks sold in rural roadside shops…

Biking on Laos’ Future High Speed Rail Route – Part 2/5

With additional writing by Will Stauffer-Norris Following the proposed route of a high-speed rail—by bicycle, in the uplands of Southeast Asia—proves to be a challenging prospect. But our trek is necessary to truly understand how the massive new railroad would change the region’s cultural and physical landscape—its friction of terrain. We gawk at the landscape,…

Biking the Course of Southeast Asia’s Future High-Speed Railway – Part 1/5

It was 7:30 in the morning, and we were already blanketed with a thin film of fine red dust. Any relief the high-altitude provincial capital of Phongsali had given us from the mid-May heat was long gone. Our jet-black bicycles, gear piled atop them, were orange and silty as we rolled up, unexpectedly, to the…