Gregg Treinish, both an adventurer and a conservationist, formulated the idea for ASC in late 2010. He believes firmly that it is the responsibility of those who recreate in natural areas to protect those same areas. Gregg has worked as a wildlife biologist, a backcountry guide, and a supervisor in wilderness therapy programs in Colorado and Montana. He has traveled to six continents and continues to explore our world. In 2004 he hiked the 2,174-mile Appalachian Trail, and in 2008 he completed the first ever trek of the Andes Mountain Range, which took more than 22 months and covered 7,800 miles. Gregg was awarded the National Geographic Adventurer of the Year award in November of 2008 for this accomplishment. Gregg was recently named to the Christian Science Monitor's 30 under 30 list in January of 2012 and was named a National Geographic Emerging Explorer in May 2013. Gregg lives and plays in Bozeman, MT.

Armed with skis and professional-caliber mountain skills, the Shifting Ice and Changing Tides all-women team is set off last week on a human- and wind-powered skiing and sailing expedition to the West Coast of Greenland. The team, made up of professional skiers, scientists, and National Geographic Young Explorer Nat Segal, will be exploring Greenland and…

When paddler/filmmaker Steve Weileman bottled his first sample of sea water off a remote, undeveloped section of the Alaskan coast, it looked transparent and pristine.  Weeks later when Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC) partner scientist Abby Barrows looked at the same sample under her microscope she found what she finds in more than 85 percent of surface sea…

Jeremy Jones at the office. Photo by Clark Fyans My organization, Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC), has always been concerned with connecting the adventure and science communities. Both communities are very diverse, and from an adventurer’s point of view we’ve worked with the entire spectrum. Although we think that weekend warriors and average Joes can (and…

Zand and the trusty canoe. Photo by Bria Schurke. In science, like in all worthwhile pursuits, there is no guarantee of success. In fact, I would suggest that without the looming chance of failure, very few things are truly worth doing. Failure can take many forms, some more extreme than others but all provide opportunities…