Archives for October, 2015

Vegan Snacks Delivered to Your Door

When Scott Jurek set a new record for completing the Appalachian Trail in July, his average of nearly 50 miles per day for 2,189 miles was seriously impressive. Even more impressive is that Jurek cranked out 46 days of ultra marathoning on a vegan diet. Vegan, baby. Any time you restrict your food choices, eating…

To Hell and Back: Underdog Climbers Challenge Alex Honnold in 24-Hour Comp

Alex Honnold sure knows how to pack a lot of climbing into a single day. For example, in Yosemite in 2012, Honnold soloed the “Triple”—an enchainment of Yosemite’s three tallest formations: El Capitan, Half Dome, and Mt. Watkins—which cumulates to climbing over 7,000 feet of vertical rock, in just over 18 hours. It’s hardly surprising,…

6 Painful Lessons I Learned By Hiking the Grand Canyon

I guess you can call it a Grand beat down. I knew it would be hard, but not spirit-crushing hard. Our plan to walk the Grand Canyon as a sectional thru-hike would be a lengthy, logistical monster of sorts. Our food would be weighed by the ounce. Almonds and prunes would be rationed and counted…

500 Miles Through Water-Starved Outback Tests Adventurer’s Abilities

In the days and weeks after September 6, National Geographic explorer Sarah Marquis developed the odd habit of walking to her refrigerator, opening the door, and browsing through its contents. Then, closing the door, and she would go back about her day. Because the 43-year-old Swiss adventurer, who became a 2014 Nat Geo Adventurer of…

Watch: Mountain Bikers Glow and Soar on Epic Midnight Ride

The latest short film from Sweetgrass Productions is predictably epic and beautiful, though surprisingly features mountain biking instead of their true love, skiing. Check it out. Here filmmaker Mike Brown gives us a little inside scoop on how they made it happen. Where is this shot? The beginning reminds me of your glorious summer skiing…

A Year in the Wilderness: Week 4, Post #1

Yesterday morning I poked my head out of the tent and found a thin, white blanket of snow. It was the first snowfall of the season in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in Northern Minnesota– another milestone in the slow and steady transition between fall and winter. My wife, Amy Freeman, and I have…

A Backcountry Recovery in Yellowstone: “These Horses Saved My Life” (Part 5 of 5)

“Life is very, very short. It’s up to you to fill the book of life with beautiful and interesting chapters.” – Veteran Ray Knell The short days on an adventure are often the most memorable. The days when you relax, soak in the experience, and aren’t constantly pushing yourself. The days that you really get…

Can a Canoe Be a Work of Art? Why Not?

Centuries of frontiersman got by just fine with nothing more decorative than birch, but this is a different age, where the fashion is as fun as the function is important, and a collaboration between a couple Canadian brands is injecting life into a traditionally staid product category. Natasha Wittke has been hand painting canoe paddles…

Ski Resort or Sacred Mountain? Film Shows the Fight for Jumbo

“When we’re in the wild, we’re able to contemplate a world much greater than ourselves,” says Sweetgrass Productions filmmaker Nick Waggoner about his latest and most ambitious film, Jumbo Wild. In a format simlar to last year’s DamNation, also underwritten by Patagonia, which examined the role of non-productive, “deadbeat” dams in the U.S., Jumbo Wild explores the hotly contested…

A Backcountry Recovery in Yellowstone: Tracked by a Curious Bison (Part 4 of 5)

Rain and cold were our companions as we rode our horses and mules north along the eastern edge of Yellowstone Lake, North America’s largest lake above 7,000 feet. Muddy trails made travel slow and spirits sink. We had a massive 30-mile day ahead of us. The wind intensified and chilled us to our bones. The temperature wasn’t freezing, but…